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Design of Reinforced Concrete

Design of Reinforced Concrete

By Jack C. McCormac, Russell H. Brown

One of the most complete guides to concrete design and reinforcement.

Price: $238.00
Product Code/ISBN: 9781118879108
Year: 2015
Binding: Hardcover
Publisher: Wiley


Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
    1. Concrete and Reinforced Concrete
    2. Advantages of Reinforced Concrete as a Structural Material
    3. Disadvantages of Reinforced Concrete as a structural Material
    4. Historical Background
    5. Comparison of Reinforced Concrete and Structural Steel for Buildings and Bridges
    6. Compatibility of Concrete and Steel
    7. Design Codes
    8. SI Units and Shaded Areas
    9. Types of Portland Cement
    10. Admixtures
    11. Properties of Concrete
    12. Aggregate
    13. High-Strength Concretes
    14. Fiber-Reinforced Concretes
    15. Concrete Durability
    16. Reinforced Steel
    17. Grades of Reinforcing Steel
    18. SI Bar Sizes and Material Strengths
    19. Corrosive Environments
    20. Identifying Marks on Reinforcing Bars
    21. Introduction to Loads
    22. Dead Loads
    23. Live Loads
    24. Environmental Loads
    25. Selection of Design Loads
    26. Calculation Accuracy
    27. Impact of Computers on Reinforced Concrete Design
    28. Problems
  2. Flexural Analysis of Beams
    1. Introduction
    2. Cracking Moment
    3. Elastic Stresses – Concrete Cracked
    4. Ultimate or Nominal Flexural Moments
    5. SI Examples
    6. Computer Examples
    7. Problems
  3. Strength Analysis of Beams According to ACI Code
    1. Design Methods
    2. Advantages of Strength Design
    3. Structural Safety
    4. Derivation of Beam Expressions
    5. Strains in Flexural Members
    6. Balanced Sections, Tension-Controlled Sections, and Compression-Controlled or Brittle Sections
    7. Strength Reduction or Factors
    8. Minimum Percentage of Steel
    9. Balanced Steel Percentage
    10. Example Problems
    11. Computer Examples
    12. Problems
  4. Design of Rectangular Beams and One-Way Slabs
    1. Load Factors
    2. Design of Rectangular Beams
    3. Beam Design Examples
    4. Miscellaneous Beam Consideration
    5. Determining Steel Area When Beam Dimensions are Predetermined
    6. Bundled Bars
    7. One-Way Slabs
    8. Cantilever Beams and Continuous Beams
    9. SI Example
    10. Computer Example
    11. Problems
  5. Analysis and Design of T Beams and Doubly Reinforced Beams
    1. T Beams
    2. Analysis of T Beams
    3. Another Method for Analyzing T Beams
    4. Design of T Beams
    5. Design of T Beams for Negative Moments
    6. L-Shaped Beams
    7. Compression Steel
    8. Design of Doubly Reinforced Beams
    9. SI Examples
    10. Computer Examples
    11. Problems
  6. Serviceability
    1. Introduction
    2. Importance of Deflections
    3. Control of Deflections
    4. Calculation of Deflections
    5. Effective Moments of Inertia
    6. Long-Term Deflections
    7. Simple-Beam Deflections
    8. Continuous -Beam Deflections
    9. Types of Cracks
    10. Control of Flexural Cracks
    11. ACI Code Provisions Concerning Cracks
    12. Miscellaneous Cracks
    13. SI Examples
    14. Computer Examples
    15. Problems
  7. Bond, Development Lengths, and Splices
    1. Cutting Off or Bending Bars
    2. Bond Stresses
    3. Development Lengths for Tension Reinforcing
    4. Development Lengths for Bundled Bars
    5. Hooks
    6. Development Lengths for Welded Wire Fabric in Tension
    7. Development Lengths for Compression Bars
    8. Critical Sections for Development Lengths
    9. Effect of Combined Shear and Moment on Development Lengths
    10. Effect of Shape of Moment Diagram on Development Lengths
    11. Cutting Off or Bending Bars (Continued)
    12. Bar Splices in Flexural Members
    13. Tension Splices
    14. Compression Splices
    15. Headed and Mechanically Anchored Bars
    16. SI Examples
    17. Computer Example
    18. Problems
  8. Shear and Diagonal Tension
    1. Introduction
    2. Shear Stresses in Concrete Beams
    3. Lightweight Concrete
    4. Shear Strength of Concrete
    5. Shear Cracking of Reinforced Concrete Beams
    6. Web Reinforcement
    7. Behavior of Beams with Web Reinforcement
    8. Design for Shear
    9. ACI Code Requirements
    10. Shear Design Example Problems
    11. Economical Spacing of Stirrups
    12. Shear Friction and Corbels
    13. Shear Strength of Members Subjected to Axial Forces
    14. Shear Design Provisions for Deep Beams
    15. Introductory Comments on Torsion
    16. SI Example
    17. 17 Computer Example
    18. Problems
  9. Introduction to Columns
    1. General
    2. Types of Columns
    3. Axial Load Capacity of Columns
    4. Failure of Tied and Spiral Columns
    5. Code Requirements for Cast-in-Place Columns
    6. Safety Provisions for Columns
    7. Design Formulas
    8. Comments on Economical Column Design
    9. Design of Axially Loaded Columns
    10. SI Example
    11. 11 Computer Example
    12. Problems
  10. Design of Short Columns Subject to Axial Load and Bending
    1. Axial Load and Bending
    2. The Plastic Centroid
    3. Development of Interaction Diagrams
    4. Use of Interaction Diagrams
    5. Code Modifications of Column Interaction Diagrams
    6. Design and Analysis of Eccentrically Loaded Columns Using Interaction Diagrams
    7. Shear Columns
    8. Biaxial Bending
    9. Design of Biaxially Loaded Columns
    10. Continued Discussion of Capacity Reduction Factors
    11. Computer Example
    12. Problems
  11. Slender Columns
    1. Introduction
    2. Nonsway and Sway Frames
    3. Slenderness Effects
    4. Determining k Factors with Alignment Charts
    5. Determining k Factors with Equations
    6. First-Order Analyses Using Special Member Properties
    7. Slender Columns in Nonsway and Sway Frames
    8. ACI Code Treatments of Slenderness Effects
    9. Magnification of Column Moments in Nonsway Frames
    10. Magnification of Columns Moments in Sway Frames
    11. Analysis of Sway Frames
    12. Computer Examples
    13. Problems
  12. Footings
    1. Introduction
    2. Types of Footings
    3. Actual Soil Pressures
    4. Allowable Soil Pressures
    5. Design of Wall Footings
    6. Design of Square Isolated Footings
    7. Footings Supporting Round or Regular Polygon-Shaped Columns
    8. Load Transfer from Columns to Footings
    9. Rectangular Isolated Footings
    10. Combined Footings
    11. Footing Design for Equal Settlements
    12. Footings Subjected to Axial Loads and Moments
    13. Transfer of Horizontal Forces
    14. Plain Concrete Footings
    15. SI Example
    16. Computer Examples
    17. Problems
  13. Retaining Walls
    1. Introduction
    2. Types of Retaining Walls
    3. Drainage
    4. Failures of Retaining Walls
    5. Lateral Pressure on Retaining Walls
    6. Footing Soil Pressures
    7. Design of Semi gravity Retaining Walls
    8. Effect of Surcharge
    9. Estimating the Sizes of Cantilever Retaining Walls
    10. Design Procedure for Cantilever Retaining Walls
    11. Cracks and Wall Joints
    12. Problems
  14. Continuous Reinforced Concrete Structures
    1. Introduction
    2. General Discussion of Analysis Methods
    3. Qualitative Influence Lines
    4. Limit Design
    5. Limit Design Under the ACIT Code
    6. Preliminary Design of Members
    7. Approximate Analysis of Continuous Frames for Vertical Loads
    8. Approximate Analysis of Continuous Frames for Lateral Loads
    9. Computer Analysis of Building Frames
    10. Development Length Requirements for Continuous Members
    11. Problems
  15. Torsion
    1. Introduction
    2. Torsional Reinforcing
    3. Torsional Moments that Have to be Considered in Design
    4. Torsional Stresses
    5. When Torsional Reinforcing is Required by the ACI
    6. Torsional Moment Strength
    7. Design of Torsional Reinforcing
    8. Additional ACI Requirements
    9. Example Problems Using U.S. Customary Units
    10. SI Equations and Example Problem
    11. Computer Example
    12. Problems
  16. Two-Way Slabs, Direct Design Method
    1. Introduction
    2. Analysis of Two-Way Slabs
    3. Design of Two-Way Slabs by the ACI Code
    4. Column and Middle Strips
    5. Shear Resistance of Slabs
    6. Depth Limitations and Stiffness Requirements
    7. Limitations of Direct Design Method
    8. Distribution of Moments in Slabs
    9. Design of an Interior Flat Plate
    10. Placing of Live Loads
    11. Analysis of Two-Way Slabs with Beams
    12. Transfer of Moments and Shears between Slabs and Columns
    13. Openings in Slab Systems
    14. Computer Example
    15. Problems
  17. Two-Way Slabs, Equivalent Frame Method
    1. Moment Distribution for Nonprismatic Members
    2. Introduction to the Equivalent Frame Method
    3. Properties of Slab Beams
    4. Properties of Columns
    5. Example Problem
    6. Computer Analysis
    7. Computer Example
    8. Problems
  18. Walls
    1. Introduction
    2. Non-Load-Bearing Walls
    3. Load-Bearing Concrete Walls-Empirical Design Method
    4. Load-Bearing Concrete Walls-Rational Design
    5. Shear Walls
    6. ACI Provisions for Shear Walls
    7. Economy in Wall Construction
    8. Computer Example
    9. Problems
  19. Prestressed Concrete
    1. Introduction
    2. Advantages and Disadvantages of Prestressed Concrete
    3. Pretensioning and Posttensioning
    4. Materials Used for Prestressed Concrete
    5. Stress Calculations
    6. Shapes of Prestressed Sections
    7. Prestress Losses
    8. Ultimate Strength of Prestressed Sections
    9. Deflections
    10. Shear in Prestressed Sections
    11. Design of Shear Reinforcement
    12. Additional Topics
    13. Computer Example
    14. Problems
  20. Reinforced Concrete Masonry
    1. Introduction
    2. Masonry Materials
    3. Specified Compressive Strength of Masonry
    4. Maximum Flexural Tensile Reinforcement
    5. Walls with Out-of-Place Loads—Non-Load-Bearing Walls
    6. Masonry Lintels
    7. Walls with Out-of-Plane—Load-Bearing
    8. Walls with In-Plane—Shear Walls
    9. Computer Example
    10. Problems

Tables and Graphs: U.S. Customary Units

Tables in SI Unites

The Strut-and-Tie Method of Design

  1. Introduction
  2. Deep Beams
  3. Shear Span and Behavior Regions
  4. Truss Analogy
  5. Definitions
  6. ACI Code Requirements for Strut-and-Tie Design
  7. Selecting a Truss Model
  8. Angles of Struts in Truss Models
  9. Design Procedure

Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures

  1. Introduction
  2. Maximum Considered Earthquake
  3. Soil Site Class
  4. Risk and Importance Factors
  5. Seismic Design Categories
  6. Seismic Design Loads
  7. Detailing Requirement for Different Classes of Reinforced Concrete Moment Frames
  8. Problems
  9. Glossary
  10. Index