BNi Building News

Serving the Information Needs of the Construction Industry since 1946.


Flags of Our Fathers, Hardcover

Flags of Our Fathers, Hardcover

By James Bradley, Ron Powers

The Battle of Iwo Jima, fought in the winter of 1945 on a rocky island south of Japan, brought a ferocious slice of hell to earth

Price: $21.99
Product Code/ISBN: 9780553111330
Year: 2000
Binding: Hardcover     Page Count: 384
Publisher: Bantam Books


The Battle of Iwo Jima, fought in the winter of 1945 on a rocky island south of Japan, brought a ferocious slice of hell to earth: in a month's time, more than 22,000 Japanese soldiers would die defending a patch of ground a third the size of Manhattan, while nearly 26,000 Americans fell taking it from them.

The battle was a turning point in the war in the Pacific, and it produced one of World War II's enduring images: a photograph of six soldiers raising an American flag on the flank of Mount Suribachi, the island's commanding high point.

One of those young Americans was John Bradley, a Navy corpsman who a few days before had braved enemy mortar and machine-gun fire to administer first aid to a wounded Marine and then drag him to safety. For this act of heroism Bradley would receive the Navy Cross, an award second only to the Medal of Honor.

Bradley, who died in 1994, never mentioned his feat to his family. Only after his death did Bradley's son James begin to piece together the facts of his father's heroism, which was but one of countless acts of sacrifice made by the young men who fought at Iwo Jima.

Flags of Our Fathers recounts the sometimes tragic life stories of the six men who raised the flag that February day -- one an Arizona Indian who would die following an alcohol-soaked brawl, another a Kentucky hillbilly, still another a Pennsylvania steel-mill worker -- and who became reluctant heroes in the bargain.

A strongly felt and well-written entry in a spate of recent books on World War II, Flags gives a you-are-there depiction of that conflict's horrible arenas -- and a moving homage to the men whom fate brought there.

- Gregory McNamee